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the federal deficit in half, instead he doubled it. >> rose: joining me from washington, d.c. is albert hunt of bloomberg news and john harris of politico. from des moines, iowa, john mile man. in new york, mark hall prin, cokie roberts and mat dowd of abc news and bloomberg news. i'm pleased they have them back on this program. we go to washington and albert hunt. where are we? >> charlie, i think that the fat lady is started to sing. it looks like thingsre moving in a very, very slow but steady direction in barack obama's favor both in the popular vote and the electoral vote. i base that on the polls, to be sure. also talking to both sides today i think's clearly more confidence in the obama camp. i think this is one of those great elections. there are very few of them, 2004 and 2000 were two where you aren't certain who is going to win but certainly all signs are pointing to a small obama victory tomorrow. >> rose: john harris? >> i agree with that if you look at these numbers and you look at the electoral college landscape and through any conventional prism what al said is completely tru
. will either candidate's plan actually work? from the pbs newshour, frontline, washington week, and need to know, this is "election 2012: what's at stake." >> announcer: from the tisch wnet studios in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> thanks for joining us. tonight we are going to do something different. combining the resources of pbs's news and public affairs programs, we are going to look beyond election day and examine how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candi
their voices. they will play a very important role. it you are not going to be able to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable rol
will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threatens our children's future, our majority passed a budget that begins to solve the problems. now, while others chose inaction in the face of this threat, we offered solutions. and the american people want solutions. and tonight, they have responded by renewing our house republican majority. >> the republicans will now have 221 seats, the 164 for the democrats. one wonders whether the leader the democratic part
the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and political interests might develop some people might focus around one candidate or another. this just doesn't occur to them or at least they don't ask the hard questions. so anyway, meanwhile the presidency is now the
of those who prevailed in their second term includes george washington, james madison, and rejection, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiat
to washington to begin the hard work of repairing frayed relationships with the other side after a bitter, sometimes petty campa n campaign. it was well after midnight when the president, vice president and their families hugged and waved to supporters from the stage at mccormick place after president obama declared victory. >> tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. >> this is a cbs news special report. >> reporter: in the end, the popular vote was close, reflecting a deeply divided nation. >> the president has about a million more votes. >> reporter: but the president won an out-sized victory in the electoral college, by nearly running the table in the nine battleground states. >> the state of iowa, cbs news projects, will go to president obama. barack obama will be the winner in virginia. cbs news is projecting that president obama has won the state of ohio. >> reporter: a hoarse, but clearly relieved president obama, said he had spoken to governor romney by phone and congratulated h
-- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatev
politicians in washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves. so, wisconsin, we know what change is. we know what the future requires. we don't need a big government agenda or a small government agenda. we need a middle class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility. we don't need a partisan agenda. we need a common sense agenda that says, when we educate a poor child, we'll a. be better off we need a vision that says we don't just look out for yourself. we look out for one another. we look out for future generations. and we meet those obligations by working together. that's the change we believe in. that's what this election's all. now, let's be clear. achieving this agenda won't be easy. it's never been easy. we always knew that. back in 2008, when we talked about change i told you, i wasn't just talking about changing presidents. i wasn't just talking about changing parties. i was talking about changing our politics. i ran because the voices of the american people, your voice, had been shut out of our democracy for way too long. by lobby
washington from the inside. only from the outside. let's make sure and give him that chance, okay? >> morrisville, pennsylvania will hear that same message later on this hour and right now vice presidential candidate paul ryan is speaking in minneapolis. >> the five of us, we're in congress together. president obama has not met with the republican leaders in the house or the senate since july. >> boo! >> we have a debt crisis coming, we have budget problems, we have economic problems. that's not leadership. we need a leader. now the reason mitt romney and i keep talking about our five-point plan is because we believe we owed you our fellow citizens an actual plan. we owe you solutions, we owe you ideas. real reforms can be had to get a real recovery. we had real recovery in this state in this country let's use that recovery and put people back to work. let's get the keystone pipeline, let's get more gas, more coal and renewables. i tell you what, we know what layoffs are, we have family and friends that we know of who are in their 40s or their 50s or their 60s, prime working years
. that's the attitude in washington that needs to change. now, virginia, after four years as president, you know me. you know me. so when you're trying to sort through this argument about change, part of what you have to ask yourself is, who do you trust? when you are talking about the economy and policy that is so critical to our future, you've got to ask yourself, who do you trust? you may not agree with every decision i have made -- michele does not agree with every decision i have made. there may be times when you are frustrated at the pace of change. i am frustrated sometimes with the pace of change. but you know i mean what i say and i say what i mean. you know what i believe, you know where i stand, what i said we would end the war in iraq, we ended it. what i said we would pass health care reform, we passed it. when i said we would repeal do not ask do not tell, we repeal that. you know i tell the truth. and most importantly, you know i will fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. so let me tell you, i know what will change looks like because i f
in washington and making history at the same time. that story next. ♪ ♪ ♪ mom? dad? guys? [ engine turns over ] [ engine revs ] ♪ he'll be fine. [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. take advantage of exceptional values during the season of audi event. to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ bikes and balloons, and noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. a wand, some wings, soup with good things. sidewalks and doodles and wholesome noodles. puddles and pails and yes, puppy dog tails. for a lunch like this, there's a hug and a kiss. because that's what happy kids are made of. campbell'
'm in a bit of a food coma. i need to admit that. i may be slow. >> well done. and from washington, from "the washington post" newsroom, pulitzer prize-winning editorial writer for "the washington post," jonathan capehart. >> hello. i spent a long time on the road driving back from south hampton, but i made it in time. >> thank goodness. since andrew ross sorkin is adopting the bush policy of preemption, let's begin with him. >> okay. very good. >> what's at stake, obviously, a lot of posturing over the past couple of weeks since the election about the fiscal cliff. what is at stake here for both sides? what happens if they don't get a deal? >> well, look. i think what happens to both sides, it's not even what happens to both sides, what happens to us which is the collective, right? it's what happens to the country which is 4% of gdp disappears overnight. and that's what this is all about. by the way, it's not just about what happens january 1st or 11:59 the day before january 1st. it's already starting to impact the economy. whether it impacts consumers -- and we'll find out today, by the wa
dime earned by family-owned businesses, the president wants to take back to washington, d.c. i'm in favor of a balanced approach. i'm committed to fairness in american society. but, mr. speaker, i ask you, is the problem that taxes are too low or is the problem that spending is too high? what better than class warfare, mr. speaker. we are better than saying we are going to ask the them to bear the burden while the we been fit. -- ben fifment -- benefit. 320 million of us have to come together, mr. speaker. on tough, tough challenges. challenges that this house has crafted solutions to. these solutions are not easy. these solutions are not pain free. these solutions involve shared commitment from every single american. because as freedom is eroding in this country, every single american suffers. and economic opportunity and economic liberty is expanded in this country, absolutely every american benefits. we can do better, mr. speaker. as a nation we have done better, as the united states house of representatives. and i come here today just to remind my president, the white house
. now that the elections are over, will washington do anything or will the town always on break continue to object structure, politicize and, of course, our favorite phrase kick that can down the road? the new washington is basically the same z the one before the election. the president is still obama, the senate is still solidly democratic and the house is republican, albeit by a small erma jort. three people in charge had this to say after the election. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but americans. >> it's better to dance than to fight. it's better to work together. everything doesn't have to be a fight. >> i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together. >> because the american people expect us to find common ground, we're willing to accept additional revenues via tax reform. >> legislation is the art of compromising and consensus building. >> despite all the frustrations of washington, i'
against human desire. back cannot work. i am a student at george washington university. there is a large push from the and the price of a community about legalization of marijuana. -- from the undergraduate timidity about legislation and marijuana. could this lead to a nationwide reform movement? >> it is different. i presume the undergraduate movement at gwi is people who want to get something. temperance movement was to deny somebody else opportunity to get something. the women's movement that was the firast mass move apart -- movement for prohibition was very noble. women were victimized by prohibition in horrible ways. women have no voting rights, the bourse was a rarity. -- women had no voting rights, divorce was a rarity. it was an effort to free the family, free women from this. it is hard to get my arms around comparison between that and an undergraduate desire for marijuana. >> most major changes in the country, from popular movements, some of them start on college campuses, some in other places. >> there is a meaningful parallel. it is generational. the same generation that is
-seltzer on facebook. >>> they thought they had it. let's play "hardball." hi i'm chris in washington, let me start with this. when a political party gets beat the knifes come out, first you blame the candidate. next you blame the campaign just as easy. if you lose everything was wrong, like shooting fish in a barrel, blame everything. the hard part is figuring out the did you go too wide and thin or too narrow and tough? did you broad widely that you stood for nothing or did you circle the wagon so tightly that you left out country? the republican di immigration policy or too moderate? one thing you can never be wrong on. if you lose you can't brag. if you lose everybody gets it and nobody will admit she's wrong or he's wrong. both analysts joy, you first then john jump in. it seemse trial balloons for nextime 2016, the twotions in thes people like rubio, down in florida talking about t seven days of creatagain. then you've other endworld, you've got chris christie talking about how many days will it take us to c the mess secular real world and one off in the id world tha
of acceptable discussion. it's only in official in washington that this has not been, you know, accepted, and, by the way, i hate to pick the liberals down one more time, but i have never, in my life, heard legalization of drugs talk about in a presidential debate until the first republican primary debit, end of last year or this year, and they got a big round of applause. they did not get through it off the stage. they got laughed at by mitt romney and the rest of them, but you take out the little, what we call in marxist theory, the super structure of the party apparatus, and everybody takes it seriously. maybe the guys will contradict me. >> i prefer taxes on consumption opposed to an investment or anything that creates additional income. i'm not a fan of the drug war so i don't object to it. i'm skeptical of marijuana legalization as a grand deficit reduction strategy. i have to see numbers suggesting it would bring in the types of revenue that we're really talking about, and politically, it will be a very difficult thing to do so i'm not sure -- i'm in favor of it, but i'm not sure it's
of power." it's no longer forthcoming, it is here. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. good morning, andrea. >> hi there. >> john heilemann, it's been such a long, long road since you guys started reporting on president barack obama -- then-senator barack obama's first election campaign in 2007. here we are five years later, a very emotional moment for the president who has endured five years of the highest highs and the lowest lows in politics. this has to be one of the most special moments for the man. >> undoubtedly. you know, it will be -- you think about the significance of him winning the first time, obviously, an historic moment. but in a lot of ways, you know, if he had lost on tuesday night, there would have been a lot of people who kind of consigned that victory to an accident. >> he would have been an aberration of history. >> almost re-election means as much and maybe in some ways more than the first time, you know. he's not a guy given to public emotion, displays of emotion. back in 2008
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
picture from the ronald reagan building in washington, where we will continue our live coverage of a post-election discussion and analysis, "cq" ."oll call live coverage starting at about 1 pop 45 eastern. while we wait, we're keeping an eye on tweeds that reporters are posting about the election. again, coverage of the "cq" "roll call" discussion coming up. right now, war on the election and what is next for congress on to de's "washington journal." reporter roundtable with margaret talev from bloomberg news and scott wilson from "the washington post." here is your special coverage from this morning. what is next? what is the first item for the second obama administration? guest: the first question is the so-called fiscal cliff, which no one wants the country to go over but no one as a way to fix. the president will spend most of the next year working on that. he will have staff issues to work on with turnover in his cabinet, and the senior levels in the west wing as well. things he will take on first. host: margaret talev, what did you hear from him wednesday about negotiations on the f
. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking about contraception or ever was before the committee at the time, that is an image of perjury is exactly why republicans are having a hard time in connecting with female voters in that gender gap. >> romney did significantly improve among white women. not only did not college white women, but also the college white women. this is the first time the democrats have lost them since 1988. >> there is also of the marriage gap. if you are a married woman, you vote different in different ways. that is another thing the republican party is facing. there is new to an era where you bought your identity rather than your interest. >>
that the election is over hopefully we'll have a moment in washington where the leaders come together and on tax reform and education and immigration and fiscal policy, now that we're no longer the issue of we have a reelection, that's done. barack obama has run his last campaign and you have divided government. i think the mandate the american people was sending is work together. focus on us not what divides you as politicians, focus on us. and i don't offer misplaced optimism often. because in washington you can get pessimistic quick. but i do have confidence there is path way on tax reform, on continued education reform, on doing some smart things around energy. and that's the test of the ment and the leaders in the senate and houses. can they come together post election. and for a period of time put your needs and the needs of the country first. and i have a great deal of confidence we'll do that. so i look forward to talking to you about the election that just happened. [applause] >> thank you for having me back. it's great to be back at the university of delaware and thank you for coming.
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
, woman and child in greece. today voters could make washington state the first state to make and use and sell marijuana. you would have to be over 21 to buy over a licensed dealer. the federal government can challenge the legality. >> brian: candidates, convincing the american people is half of the battle. they have to convince 535 memberings of congress to take their side, too. who better to do the job. back to the political panel who experienced that for themselves x. first of all for the middle of gridlock, how do we break it can they do. >> if romney gets elected you start with a new day. the republicans would try to move something forward and if the president gets reelected you start where you are today with a lot of the grid lock. >> brian:ent senator baye. you said no one was doing anything. do you see it changing if president obama gets another four years. >> i think he will think about his legacy and there is a chance and he will probably move to the middle and embrace the simpson-bowles report and make compromises with the entitlement reform. my guess he would be willing to
in washington. more americans are talking about the constitution because of senator lee and more intelligently because of him and members of the senate including some in his own caucus are feeling a little more pain and anxiety when they back efforts that lack a firm foundation in the founding principles. knowing that senator lee will be there at the barricades with a copy of this dog your pocket constitution. welcome back senator lee. [applause] >> thank you. is good to be among friends. also hard to believe it has been two years since i was elected, almost two years since i took office. i'm glad we will be hearing from my good friend and soon-to-be colleague ted cruise in just a little while. i was very pleased when he was elected. i met him just a couple years ago just after my election and shortly before he announced his candidacy. i look forward to joining him and having enjoy in our body. i especially look forward to no longer being the newest member of the senate. has been a rough transition. the security staff is finally recognizing me as a senator. i know offer get carded. i am from u
-paying jobs for people struggling in this economy. >> well, now washington and the world can breathe a sigh of relief. the horrible crisis that would occur if we defaulted, the likelihood of recession has been averted, but we have a lot more work to do. a lot more work to do. the bill, which had things that were mentioned, had a lot of things we did not like. it had some things we like, but it really making sure no benefits in medicare, -- social security, and medicaid were cut. but, it is now time for congress to get back to the regularly- scheduled programming, and that means jobs. washington has been consumed with averting default, the nation's unemployment problem has been worsening. it is time for jobs to be moved back to the front burner. with the debt reduction package completed, we now have a single- minded focus on jobs for september by removing the threat of default for the next 18 months and by proving both parties can come together to get our deficit under control we have provided certainty to the credit markets. the debt limit agreement largely resolve the budgets for the next
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
stumbling block to real change in washington is the total resistance to admitting the country is broke. this has made compromising just to agree to increase spending inevitable because neither side has any intention of cutting spending. the country will remain a divisive since there is nothing left to divvy up. without this, spenders will continue to march toward a fiscal cliff much bigger than anticipated in january. i have thought a lot about why those of us who believe in liberty as a solution have done so poorly in convincing others of its benefits. if this is what we claim it is, the principle that protects social economic decisions necessary for national prosperity and the best chance for peace should be an easy sell, that history has shown the masses have resented the promises of authoritarian, of which are rarely if ever fulfilled. should we have a authoritarianism or liberty? if the authoritarianism leads to poverty or war or less freedom for individuals or is controlled by special interest, the people should be begging for liberty? there certainly was a strong incentive for f
to health care and the annual national lawyer's convention in washington, d.c. hosted by the federalist society. the topic is the future of constitutional law and the supreme court. this is just over half an hour. >> good morning, for the first address today, we welcome a man who is no stranger to hard work. raised in ad 340est household, learned the value of money, hard work, and traditional values, and this guided his pursuit of the american dream ever since. after earning the ged from smu, worked in the largest law firm specializing in health care manners. later, in founding the hospital corporation, he established what has become the largest for-profit health care conglomerate in the nation. they employee over 199,000 people, that's job creation, of course. [applause] it provides quality health care to millions of people, but he didn't rest there. they have also worked with a group calledded world vision to provide primary health care, a primary health care system in kenya, and he upheld the commitment to the people of florida emphasizing the importance of accountability, ran the ca
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)

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